Bottle-Type Water Dispensers

Bottle-type water dispensers are free-standing and include a multi-gallon water bottle that sits on top of the dispenser that provides potable water. They may have one or two spigots that provide cold (or chilled) water or hot water. There are several types of bottle-type water dispensers: those that provide room temperature water that is neither chilled nor heated, those provide cold water, and those that provide cold water and hot water. These standards apply to bottle-type dispensers that provide cold or hot water.

California, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Oregon and Rhode Island have adopted efficiency standards for bottle-type water dispensers.

Excerpts from each state’s standards are shown below; text in italics is directly excerpted from the state regulations.

The Multi-State Collaborative is providing these standard summaries as a courtesy; these materials are not intended to interpret state regulations. The user is responsible for reading and interpreting the regulations.

Which states have a standard?

Of the states participating in the Multi-State Appliance Collaborative, the following have a standard for Bottle-Type Water Dispensers; the date in parentheses shows the effective date of the standard:

California

Effective January 1, 2006

Definitions

California Title 20 Section 1602(b), Also see section 1602 (a) for general definitions

“Bottle-type water dispenser” means a water dispenser that uses a bottle or reservoir as the source of potable water.
“Water dispenser” means a factory-made assembly that mechanically cools and heats potable water and that dispenses the cooled or heated water by integral or remote means.

Also see section 1602 (a) for general definitions.

Energy Efficiency Standards

California Title 20 Section 1605.3(a)9

Energy Efficiency Standard for Water Dispensers. The standby energy consumption of bottle-type water dispensers, and point of use water dispensers, dispensing both hot and cold water, manufactured on or after January 1, 2006, shall not exceed 1.2 kWh/day.

Test Methods

California Title 20 Section 1604 (a)4

The test method for water dispensers is EPA Energy Star Program Requirements for Bottled Water Coolers (2004).
EXCEPTION for units equipped with an integral, automatic timer. Units equipped with an integral, automatic timer shall not be tested using Section 4D, “Timer Usage,” of the referenced test method.

For more information on California’s standards, please see the California page.

Connecticut

Effective January 1, 2009

Definitions

Regulations and Procedures for Establishing Energy Efficiency Standards for Certain Appliances and Products—Section 16a-48-1 (4) of the Connecticut General Statutes

"Bottle-type water dispenser" means a water dispenser that uses a bottle or reservoir as the source of potable water.”

Standard

Regulations and Procedures for Establishing Energy Efficiency Standards for Certain Appliances and Products, Section 16a-48-4 (N)

Bottle-type water dispensers that are designed for the dispensing of both hot and cold water that are sold, offered for sale, or installed on or after January 1, 2009 shall have a stand-by energy consumption of ≤ 1.2 kWh per day.

Test Method

Regulations and Procedures for Establishing Energy Efficiency Standards for Certain Appliances and Products, Section 16a-48-5 (N)

The test method for bottle-type water dispensers is EPA Energy Star Program Requirements for Bottled Water Coolers (2004), with the exception that units equipped with and integral automatic timer shall not be tested using Section 4D, “Timer Usage”, of the referenced test method.

For more information on Connecticut’s standards, please see the Connecticut page.

New Hampshire

Effective January 1, 2009

Definitions

NH Senate Bill 259, (RSA 339-G) Section 339-G:1

"Bottle-type water dispenser" means a water dispenser that uses a bottle or reservoir as the source of potable water.

Energy Efficiency Standards

NH Senate Bill 259, (RSA 339-G) Section 339-G:3

Bottle-type water dispensers designed for dispensing both hot and cold water shall not have standby energy consumption greater than 1.2 kilowatt hours per day.

Test Method

NH Senate Bill 259, (RSA 339-G) Section 339-G:3

The test method for bottle type water dispensers is in accordance with the test criteria contained in Version 1.1 of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's ""ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Bottled Water Coolers," except that units with an integral, automatic timer shall not be tested using Section D, ""Timer Usage," of the test criteria. The test method for water dispensers is EPA Energy Star Program Requirements for Bottled Water Coolers (2004).

EXCEPTION for units equipped with an integral, automatic timer. Units equipped with an integral, automatic timer shall not be tested using Section 4D, "Timer Usage," of the referenced test method.

Labeling Requirements

NH Senate Bill 259, (RSA 339-G) Section 339-G:7

Manufacturers of new products listed in RSA 339-G:2, I shall identify each product offered for sale or installation in the state as in compliance with the provisions of this chapter by means of a mark, label, or tag on the product and packaging at the time of sale or installation. The commission shall adopt rules, pursuant to RSA 541-A, governing the identification of such products and packaging, which shall be coordinated to the greatest practical extent with the labeling programs of other states and federal agencies with equivalent efficiency standards. The commission shall allow the use of existing marks, labels, or tags which connote compliance with the efficiency requirements of this chapter.

For more information on New Hampshire’s standards, please see the New Hampshire page.

Oregon

Effective September 1, 2009

Definitions

Oregon Revised Statutes, ORS 469.229 (3)

“Bottle-type water dispenser” means a water dispenser that uses a bottle or reservoir as the source of potable water.”

Standard

Oregon Revised Statutes, ORS 469.233 (12)

Bottle-type water dispensers designed for dispensing both hot and cold water may not have standby energy consumption greater than 1.2 kilowatt-hours per day, as measured in accordance with the test criteria contained in Version 1 of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s “Energy Star Program Requirements for Bottled Water Coolers,” except that units with an integral, automatic timer may not be tested using Section D, “Timer Usage,” of the test criteria.

For more information on Oregon ’s standards, please see the Oregon page.

Rhode Island

Effective January 1, 2008

Definition

The Energy and Consumer Savings Act of 2005 –39-27-3 (d)

"Bottle-type water dispenser" means a water dispenser that uses a bottle or reservoir as the source of potable water.”

Standard

The Energy and Consumer Savings Act of 2005 –39-27-5 (b)(1)

Bottle-type water dispensers designed for dispensing both hot and cold water shall not have standby energy consumption greater than one and two tenths (1.2) kilowatt-hours per day.

For more information on Rhode Island’s standards, please see the Rhode Island page