Hot Food Holding Cabinets

Hot food holding cabinets are free standing, electrical appliances used in commercial kitchens to keep food warm in a heated and dry environment; they are not used to cook food.  Other uses include transporting of food for catering events and keeping dinner plates warm. Hot food holding cabinets come in a variety of styles and sizes. Most hot food holding cabinets utilize a convection heating process. These models have a heating element that can adjust the temperature and be turned on or off and a fan motor that runs continuously. Note that “cook and hold” cabinets and “proofers” are different from hot food holding cabinets and are not included in these state regulations.

California, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Oregon and Rhode Island all have efficiency standards for hot food holding cabinets. The efficiency standards are uniform across all four states and set a maximum idle energy rate of forty (40) watts per cubic foot of interior volume.

Excerpts from each state’s standards are shown below; text in italics is directly excerpted from the state regulations.

The Multi-State Collaborative is providing these standard summaries as a courtesy; these materials are not intended to interpret state regulations. The user is responsible for reading and interpreting the regulations.

Which states have a standard?

Of the states participating in the Multi-State Appliance Collaborative, the following have a standard for Hot Food Holding Cabinets; the date in parentheses shows the effective date of the standard:

California

Effective January 1, 2007

Definitions

California Title 20 Section 1602(r)

“Commercial hot food holding cabinet” means a heated, fully enclosed compartment, with one or more solid or partial glass doors, that is designed to maintain the temperature of hot food that has been cooked in a separate appliance. “Commercial hot food holding cabinet” does not include heated glass merchandising cabinets, drawer warmers or cook-and-hold appliances.

Also see section 1602 (a) for general definitions.

Energy Efficiency Standards

California Title 20 Section 1605.3 (r) 2

The idle energy rate of commercial hot food holding cabinets manufactured on or after January 1, 2006 shall be no greater than 40 watts per cubic foot of measured interior volume.

Test Methods

California Title 20 Section 1604 (r)

Two test methods are used to determine efficiency for hot food holding cabinets:

ANSI/ASTM F2140-01 (Test for idle energy rate-dry test) and US EPA’s Energy Star Guidelines, “Measuring Interior Volume” (Test for interior volume)

Labeling Requirements

California Title 20 Section 1607

All units must comply with section 1607, Marking of Appliances, which requires the following:

(a) Every unit of every appliance within the scope of Section 1601 shall comply with the applicable provisions of this Section. The effective dates of this section shall be the same as the effective dates shown in Section 1605.1, 1605.2 or 1605.3 for appliances for which there is an energy efficiency, energy consumption, energy design, water efficiency, water consumption, or water design standard in Section 1605.1, 1605.2, or 1605.3. For appliances with no energy efficiency, energy consumption, energy design, water efficiency, water consumption, or water design standard in Section 1605.1, 1605.2, or 1605.3, the effective date of this section shall be January 1, 2006.

(b) Name, Model Number, and Date.
Except as provided in Subsection (c), the following information shall be permanently, legibly, and conspicuously displayed on an accessible place on each unit:

(1) manufacturer’s name or brand name or trademark (which shall be either the name, brand, or trademark of the listed manufacturer specified pursuant to Section 1606(a)(2)(A) or, if applicable, the designated manufacturer specified pursuant to Section 1606(f)(1)(F));

(2) model number; and

(3) date of manufacture, indicating (i) year and (ii) month or smaller (e.g. week) increment. If the date is in a code that is not readily understandable to the layperson, the manufacturer shall immediately, on request, provide the code to the Energy Commission.

Subsection (c) provides exceptions to subsection (b) requirements shown above. Commercial hot food holding cabinets are not called out as exceptions.

For more information on California’s standards, please see the California page.

Connecticut

Effective January 1, 2009

Definitions

Section 16a-48 of the Connecticut General Statutes

"Commercial hot food holding cabinet" means a heated, fully-enclosed compartment with one or more solid or partial glass doors that is designed to maintain the temperature of hot food that has been cooked in a separate appliance. "Commercial hot food holding cabinet" does not include heated glass merchandizing cabinets, drawer warmers or cook-and-hold appliances.

Standard

Regulations and Procedures for Establishing Energy Efficiency Standards for Certain Appliances and Products, Section 16a-48-4 (0)

Commercial hot food holding cabinets sold, offered for sale, or installed on or after January 1, 2009 shall have an idle energy rate no greater than 40 watts per square foot of measured interior volume.

Test Method

Regulations and Procedures for Establishing Energy Efficiency Standards for Certain Appliances and Products, Section 16a-48-5 (0)

Commercial hot food holding cabinets: The test method for commercial hot food holding cabinets is ANSI/ASTM F2140-01 (test for idle energy rate-dry test), and US EPA's Energy Star Guidelines, "Measuring Interior Volume" (test for interior volume).

For more information on Connecticut’s standards, please see the Connecticut page.

New Hampshire

Effective January 1, 2009

Definitions

NH Senate Bill 259, (RSA 339-G) Section 339-G:1

"Commercial hot food holding cabinet" means a heated, fully-enclosed compartment with one or more solid or partial glass doors that is designed to maintain the temperature of hot food that has been cooked in a separate appliance. "Commercial hot food holding cabinet" does not include heated glass merchandizing cabinets, drawer warmers or cook-and-hold appliances.

Standard

NH Senate Bill 259, (RSA 339-G) Section 339-G:3

Commercial hot food holding cabinets shall have a maximum idle energy rate of 40 watts per cubic foot of interior volume.

Test Method

NH Senate Bill 259, (RSA 339-G) Section 339-G:3

The test method for commercial hot food holding cabinets is the “Idle Energy Rate-Dry Test” in ASTM F2140-01, “Standard Test Method for Performance of Hot Food Holding Cabinets” published by ASTM International. Interior volume shall be measured in accordance with the method shown in the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s “Energy Star Program Requirements for Commercial Hot Food Holding Cabinets,” as in effect on August 15, 2003.

Labeling Requirements

NH Senate Bill 259, (RSA 339-G) Section 339-G:7

Manufacturers of new products listed in RSA 339-G:2, I shall identify each product offered for sale or installation in the state as in compliance with the provisions of this chapter by means of a mark, label, or tag on the product and packaging at the time of sale or installation. The commission shall adopt rules, pursuant to RSA 541-A, governing the identification of such products and packaging, which shall be coordinated to the greatest practical extent with the labeling programs of other states and federal agencies with equivalent efficiency standards. The commission shall allow the use of existing marks, labels, or tags which connote compliance with the efficiency requirements of this chapter.

For more information on New Hampshire’s standards, please see the New Hampshire page.

Oregon

Effective September 1, 2009

Definitions

Oregon Revised Statutes, ORS 469.229 (5a)

"Commercial hot food holding cabinet" means a heated, fully-enclosed compartment with one or more solid or partial glass doors that is designed to maintain the temperature of hot food that has been cooked in a separate appliance. "Commercial hot food holding cabinet" does not include heated glass merchandizing cabinets, drawer warmers or cook-and-hold appliances.

Standard and Test Method

Oregon Revised Statutes, ORS 469.233 (13)

Commercial hot food holding cabinets shall have a maximum idle energy rate of 40 watts per cubic foot of interior volume, as determined by the “Idle Energy Rate-dry Test” in ASTM F2140-01, “Standard Test Method for Performance of Hot Food Holding Cabinets” published by ASTM International. Interior volume shall be measured in accordance with the method shown in the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s “Energy Star Program Requirements for Commercial Hot Food Holding Cabinets,” as in effect on August 15, 2003.

For more information on Oregon ’s standards, please see the Oregon page.

Rhode Island

Effective June 1, 2008

Definition

Energy and Consumer Savings Act of 2006 Section 39-27-3

"Commercial hot food holding cabinet" means a heated, fully-enclosed compartment with one or more solid or partial glass doors that is designed to maintain the temperature of hot food that has been cooked in a separate appliance. "Commercial hot food holding cabinet" does not include heated glass merchandizing cabinets, drawer warmers or cook-and-hold appliances.

Standard

Section 39-27-4 (b) (2)

Commercial hot food holding cabinets shall have a maximum idle energy rate of forty (40) watts per cubic foot of interior volume.

Test Method

Section 39-27-8 (3)

Commercial hot food holding cabinets shall be the "idle energy rate-dry test" on ASTM F2140-01, "Standard Test Method for Performance of Hot Food Holding Cabinets" published by ASTM International Interior volume and shall be measured in accordance with the method shown in the U.S. Commercial Hot Food Holding Cabinets as in effect on August 15, 2003.

For more information on Rhode Island’s standards, please see the Rhode Island page